Practice singing wrong to sing better.

12/27/2020 12:00 AM

For people who sing poorly, singing correctly feels wrong. Re-read that, slowly, because there’s a whole lot of wisdom packed into that counterintuitive statement.


When you sing, you rely on a set of subliminal mental instructions that operate your vocal equipment. For many people, those instructions contain flaws. It’s like having an operator’s manual where the paragraphs have been scrambled out of order. If you follow the manual, the machine won’t work right, not because it’s defective, but because the instructions are.


For most people who sing poorly, it’s not because their mechanism is defective. It’s because their internal instruction set is garbled. Singing well under those circumstances doesn’t feel right because—well—you’ve been following the same manual your whole life. But habits aren’t correct just because we’ve practiced them for a long time.


So, if you sing poorly, and you want to learn to sing better, you need to experiment by singing in ways that feel unnatural or uncomfortable (but not painful or damaging). Through trial-and-error, (and perhaps with external assistance from a skillful guide) you can eventually revise your defective vocal operations manual into one that’s more consistent with how your mechanism actually works. Then you will discover the beautiful vocal instrument you actually have, not the squeaky, unattractive one you think you have.

The Giles County Community Chorus is an independent, non-profit community organization dedicated to bringing our community together with exciting, progressive choral music.

Copyright © 2020 by the Giles County Community Chorus. All rights reserved.

The Giles County Community Chorus is an independent, non-profit 501(c)(3) charitable organization.

Copyright © 2017 by the Giles County Community Chorus. All rights reserved.